Tickets

10 films for $50 with punch card
$8 general admission. $7 w/UCB student ID, $7 for senior citizens
$1 discount to anyone with a bike helmet
Free on your birthday! CU Film Students get in free.

Parking

Pay lot 360 (now only $1/hour!), across from the buffalo statue and next to the Duane Physics tower, is closest to Muenzinger. Free parking can be found after 5pm at the meters along Colorado Ave east of Folsom stadium and along University Ave west of Macky.

RTD Bus

Park elsewhere and catch the HOP to campus

Import 35mm

35mm Rocks!

Long live 35mm film!

For those of us who still find magic in look of real film, we've compiled a list of upcoming screenings that will be shown on celluloid in the Boulder/Denver area. See you there!

Meantime, here's a video called “The Art of 35mm Projection.”

2018 Aug 28 Tue

Ikiru

Kanji Watanabe (Takashi Shimura), a lowly, stuck, middle-aged bureaucrat, falls ill with cancer and has less than a year to live. This simple yet deeply profound event sets into motion one of the great humane films of Kurosawa’s long and storied career, made in sharp contrast to his well-known samurai work. Watanabe is routinely ignored and taken for granted, and lacks the will to action—until his cancer diagnosis, after which he comes to a series of stark realizations and grapples with what it means to live. “One of the fine things about Ikiru is that, like other great films, it is a moral document and part of its greatness lies in the various ways in which it may be interpreted. Here, as in the novels of Dostoevsky, we see layer after layer peeled away until man stands alone––though what the layers mean and what the standing man means may vary with the interpretation.” —Donald Richie.

+ iCal/Outlook

At Muenzinger Auditorium

2018 Sep 19 Wed

Tropic Thunder

Vietnam veteran 'Four Leaf' Tayback's memoir, Tropic Thunder, is being made into a film, but Director Damien Cockburn can’t control the cast of prima donnas. Behind schedule and over budget, Cockburn is ordered by a studio executive to get filming back on track, or risk its cancellation. On Tayback's advice, Cockburn drops the actors into the middle of the jungle to film the remaining scenes but, unbeknownst to the actors and production, the group have been dropped in the middle of the Golden Triangle, the home of heroin-producing gangs.

+ iCal/Outlook

At Muenzinger Auditorium

2018 Oct 04 Thu

2001: A Space Odyssey

The experimental, mind-bending sci-fi symphony that pushes the boundaries on special effects and narrative.

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At Muenzinger Auditorium

2018 Oct 23 Tue

The Man from Hong Kong

Australian authorities arrest a man believed to be connected to the Sydney criminal underworld and send for Inspector Fang Sing Leng (Jimmy Wang Yu) from Hong Kong to question him. After the alleged criminal is assassinated, Inspector Leng and the Sydney police try to hunt down those responsible and hope to solve their case along the way.

+ iCal/Outlook

At Muenzinger Auditorium

2018 Nov 16 Fri

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest

While serving time for insanity at a state mental hospital, implacable rabble-rouser, Randle Patrick McMurphy inspires his fellow patients to rebel against the authoritarian rule of head nurse, Mildred Ratched.

+ iCal/Outlook

At Muenzinger Auditorium

2018 Nov 17 Sat

Amadeus

The incredible story of genius musician Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, told in flashback by his peer and secret rival Antonio Salieri – now confined to an insane asylum.

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At Muenzinger Auditorium

2018 Nov 28 Wed

True Stories

A small but growing Texas town, filled with strange and musical characters, celebrates its sesquicentennial and converge on a local parade and talent show.

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At Muenzinger Auditorium

2018 Dec 01 Sat

Harold and Maude

The young Harold lives in his own world of suicide-attempts and funeral visits to avoid the misery of his current family and home environment. Harold meets an 80-year-old woman named Maude who also lives in her own world yet one in which she is having the time of her life. When the two opposites meet they realize that their differences don’t matter and they become best friends and love each other.

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At Muenzinger Auditorium

2018 Dec 06 Thu

The Virgin Spring

A harrowing tale of faith, revenge, and savagery in medieval Sweden.

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At Muenzinger Auditorium

2018 Dec 08 Sat

Lawrence of Arabia

What a bold, mad act of genius it was, to make ''Lawrence of Arabia,'' or even think that it could be made. The impulse to make this movie was based, above all, on imagination. The story of ''Lawrence'' is not founded on violent battle scenes or cheap melodrama, but on David Lean's ability to imagine what it would look like to see a speck appear on the horizon of the desert, and slowly grow into a human being.

There is a moment in the film when the hero, the British eccentric soldier and author T.E. Lawrence, has survived a suicidal trek across the desert and is within reach of shelter and water--and he turns around and goes back, to find a friend who has fallen behind. This sequence builds up to the shot in which the shimmering heat of the desert reluctantly yields the speck that becomes a man--a shot that is held for a long time before we can even begin to see the tiny figure. On television, this shot doesn't work at all--nothing can be seen. In a movie theater, looking at the stark clarity of a 70mm print, we lean forward and strain to bring a detail out of the waves of heat, and for a moment we experience some of the actual vastness of the desert, and its unforgiving harshness.

''Lawrence of Arabia'' is not a simple biography or an adventure movie--although it contains both elements--but a movie that uses the desert as a stage for the flamboyance of a driven, quirky man. Although it is true that Lawrence was instrumental in enlisting the desert tribes on the British side in the 1914-17 campaign against the Turks, the movie suggests that he acted less out of patriotism than out of a need to reject conventional British society, choosing to identify with the wildness and theatricality of the Arabs. There was also a sexual component, involving his masochism.

To see it in a movie theater is to appreciate the subtlety of F.A. Young's desert cinematography--achieved despite blinding heat, and the blowing sand, which worked its way into every camera. ''Lawrence of Arabia'' was one of the last films to actually be photographed in 70mm (as opposed to being blown up to 70 from a 35mm negative). There was a hunger within filmmakers like Lean (and Kubrick, Coppola, Tarkovsky, Kurosawa and Stone) to break through the boundaries, to dare a big idea and have the effrontery to impose it on timid studio executives.

After its glorious re-release in 70mm in 1989, it has returned again to video, where it crouches inside its box like a tall man in a low room. You can view it on video and get an idea of its story and a hint of its majesty, but to get the feeling of Lean's masterpiece you need to somehow, somewhere, see it in 70mm on a big screen. This experience is on the short list of things that must be done during the lifetime of every lover of film. (R. Ebert)

+ iCal/Outlook

At Muenzinger Auditorium

2018 Dec 09 Sun

Dead Man

This American masterpiece by filmmaker Jim Jarmusch is a low-key classic of strangely poetic beauty - a western for sleepwalkers and dreamers. Features a hypnotic score by Neil Young.

+ iCal/Outlook

At Muenzinger Auditorium

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Looking for a gift for a friend?
Buy a Frequent Patron Punch Card for $50 at any IFS show. With the punch card you can see ten films (an $80 value).