Experimental Cinema Group was ushered in by Carla Selby and Gladney Oakley and was later carried forward by Bruce Conner and Stan Brakhage. It is now called First Person Cinema and the curator is Don Yannacito. This program was started in 1955 with the intention of bringing an awareness of the personal cinema to Boulder, and has become a highly respected international showcase for the makers of personal film. It is the longest existing program in the world that has been continually screening avant-garde film and video work.

The Stan Brakhage Film Series will continue to show films by Brakhage on the first Sunday of every month at 7:30pm in ATLAS 100. All shows are free and open to the public.

MOST SCREENINGS ARE MONDAYS AT 7:00 PM IN THE VISUAL ARTS COMPLEX AUDITORIUM 1B20 / ADMISSION IS $3.00

Winners of the Grillo Awards

Winners of the Grillo Awards

Monday, February 4, 2013
7:00 PM

Winners of The Grillo Awards

Made possible with funds from the Arts and Cultural Enrichment Fee. Free admission. The Grillo awards are designed to encourage excellence in filmmaking and help defray some of the expenses required to pursue a degree in film production. A total of up to $17,000 of Grillo funds is distributed each year to four tiers of production students. Final recipients and individual award amounts will be determined each semester by in-class student votes and a panel of judges made up of CU Film Studies faculty and outside professionals. A selection of award winning films will be shown one night only. The Grillo Awards are drawn from a University of Colorado Foundation fund set up in the early '90s by the founder and former Director of the CU Film Studies Program, Virgil Grillo (1938 -1994), whose dedication and vision helped shepherd Film Studies from its modest beginnings in the 1970s to an undergraduate degree program with some 600 majors.

Black Maria Film and Video Festival

Black Maria Film and Video Festival

Monday, March 4, 2013
7:00 PM at Naropa University Performing Arts Center

Since 1981, the annual Black Maria Film and Video Festival, an international juried competition and award tour, has been fulfilling its mission to advocate, exhibit and reward cutting edge works from independent film and video makers. With previous Oscar nominated and international award-winning shorts, the festival is widely known for its National Public Exhibition Program, which remains loyal to featuring a variety of bold contemporary works drawn from the annual collection of 50 award winning films and videos. Now in its 32nd year, the Black Maria Festival distinguishes itself as a cornerstone for artists to express the inventive, insightful, and uncommon spirit. Festival Director John Columbus will present a program of the 2013 winning shorts, ranging from a variety of narrative, animation, documentary, and experimental.

Jennifer West

Jennifer West

Saturday, March 16, 2013
A Brakhage Center Symposium Event, time TBA

Jennifer West makes 16mm, 35mm and 70mm films by manipulating the film celluloid to a level of performance. The film emulsion might be doused with perfume, Jack Daniels or pepper spray, skateboarded on or dragged through tar pits. West is also known for the Zine booklets that she produces featuring the production stills showing the making of the films. The destroyed and distressed films are then digitized and shown as looping video projections in museums and art galleries. She is best known for the live performance, SKATE THE SKY staged at the Tate Modern in London in 2009 where she invited skateboarders to skate over filmstrips taped to the floor of the Turbine Hall.

Peggy Ahwesh

Peggy Ahwesh

Monday, April 8, 2013
7:00 PM

Peggy Ahwesh will screen a number of videos that she has made over recent years about the archival impulse and memory, works that serve as "memory aids" and a form of self preservation, that illuminate and order the eccentric and diverse materials she has accumulated from travels, pilgrimages, quests and research trips to both unusual and ordinary places, some the results of mental journeys and intellectual tours, some offering solace and hope in predictions of the past and the future. In BETHLAHEM (2009) she works through her personal archive of accumulated footage, editing together memories like a string of pearls with a deliberate pace and bittersweet memory of home. In WADENA (2012) an observational work of straightforward intent, she was interested in the slow return to normal, the stoic task of rebuilding after a tornado hit a small town in the midwest. THE APE OF NATURE(2010) investigates memory and the uncanny through the experience of hypnotized subjects who communicate with "the other side" evoking a murky past and foreshadowing a dystopic future in a glacial and slow storytelling that is informed by suggestion and the unconscious. And other recent short works.

Graduate Student Showcase

Graduate Student Showcase

Monday, April 22, 2013
7:00 PM

Usama Alshaibi: "My work explores the anxieties of our clamorous society and my position as a citizen inside its construct. I believe that I am struggling as a contemporary archivist to lock down, document and decode my time. My moving images are forming and reforming, trying to transcend and find meaning in the darkness."

Mark Banzhoff: Mark is an interdisciplinary artists working in Video, Photography, Sound, Light Projection, Instillation and Performance.

Taylor Dunne: Taylor embraces the medium of film not as a means to recreate the real world, but as a tool for creating the extraordinary. Her films use found and archival footage to weave cinematic essays that explore memory embedded within human and natural environments.

Taylor McIntosh: Taylor works both with the still and moving image. He accepts and appreciates his cameras ability to remember in more detail than his memory ever could. The images he records are there for him to study- to possibly have a second chance at understanding the reality that surrounds him.

Julie Rooney: Julie's artwork explores the relationship of humans and nature through experimental cinematic video. These studies help us transcend our corporeality through comparison and introspection. Through these investigations of humans, animals, and the environment her artwork encourages critical self-reflection and an intricate examination of what it means to be human.

First Person Cinema

See previous schedules in the FPC Archive

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