Tickets

10 films for $50 with punch card
$8 general admission. $7 w/UCB student ID, $7 for senior citizens
$1 discount to anyone with a bike helmet
Free on your birthday! CU Film Students get in free.

Parking

Pay lot 360 (now only $1/hour!), across from the buffalo statue and next to the Duane Physics tower, is closest to Muenzinger. Free parking can be found after 5pm at the meters along Colorado Ave east of Folsom stadium and along University Ave west of Macky.

RTD Bus

Park elsewhere and catch the HOP to campus

 

True Stories

Muenzinger Auditorium

True Stories

David Byrne is all about cautious optimism these days. Recently, that’s taken the form of an interactive lecture series entitled “Reasons to be Cheerful,” in which Byrne catalogs and champions examples of public policy triumphs large and small from communities around the world. It’s also led to American Utopia, Byrne’s first solo record in 14 years and his artistic reaction to the political and existential fears that radiate daily from the Trump Administration.

[The project] stands as the latest involving one of Byrne’s longest-standing fascinations: how to make America (and the lives of Americans) better.

Perhaps most importantly, True Stories also marks the full emergence of Byrne’s ability to approach frightening existential questions on both a geological and subatomic scale. The film opens with a history lesson, in which Byrne traces the lifespan of the land that is now Texas from the time of the dinosaurs to the decimation of the native Americans to the oil and technology booms of the 20th century. The film’s closing sequence bookends this scene-setting with “City of Dreams”, in which Byrne recaps the same history with an implied caution: We’re only here for the middle of the story. Texas is temporary. Cherish it, before you go the way of the stegosaurus yourself.

These ideas, and the songs they would inspire, helped Byrne transition from the jittery loner of his band’s earliest record into what he is now: an almost-spiritual guide offering solace and navigation through the isolation and despair of life as we live it. No wonder he named the town Virgil.

Of course, like any artistic evolution, this switch in perspective wasn’t without its downsides. It made Byrne’s work more open-handed and accessible, but also less urgent. Its concerns with mitigating interior dread and finding joy in the everyday also operate from a position of relative privilege and, for many facing far more tangible threats to their existence, don’t always feel like a priority.

However. In a political climate where uncertainty is the rule and not the exception, it’s still comforting to know that David Byrne is out there somewhere, riding his bike and dreaming up new ways to help us understand ourselves. Some days, that’s the only reason to be cheerful that we need.

— Tyler Clark, Consequence of Sound

True Stories

Wed November 28, 7:30 PM, Muenzinger Auditorium

USA, 1986, in English, Color, 90 min, 1.85 : 1

Director: David Byrne, Writer: David Byrne, Stephen Tobolowsky, Beth Henley, Cast: David Byrne, John Goodman, Swoosie Kurtz, Spalding Gray, Annie McEnroe

remind me export to calendar recommend

Thank you, sponsors!
Radio 1190
Boulder Weekly
Your Logo Here
Movie Habit

Looking for a gift for a friend?
Buy a Frequent Patron Punch Card for $50 at any IFS show. With the punch card you can see ten films (an $80 value).